Tag Archives: Peter Wright

Diamonds, Gold and Tungsten: Peter’s Perfect Combo

AIM were asked to contribute a few thoughts toward this very good overview of why Peter Wright’s eye catching new model had proved such an instant success:

Peter Wright credits his resurgent performances to a small addition of one of his favourite dart models. The new World Matchplay champion has credited the addition of a gold coating to his Euro 11 Element diamond gripped barrel. 

Fellow dart professional Josh Payne, himself a Pro Tour winner, suggested the change during a recent practice session. Although it was merely a suggestion as to improving the darts cosmetic appeal. Peter was taken with the idea and even made a DIY version with some gold paint! 

Soon enough the folk at Red Dragon, Peter’s darts manufacture/sponsor, had found a better method of adding a coating to the production process and the initial prototypes were made and it’s fair to say that they have done OK so far!

No, you may think to yourself that ‘just a colour change’ can’t make all that difference. However, history, tech, and analysis would suggest it may well well have been the final piece of the jigsaw. Did we ask our team why and how?

The Wright Hybrid:

One of Darts World’s Coaching Corner members has long argued that the diamond fusion grip offered by Red Dragon (on their Element range) could be close to the perfect grip.

” The surface provided by Diamond fusion and the player’s fingers is absolutely ideal for a smooth release or ‘launch’. The only downside is that for many, it needs to be worn in. Peter has had high-level success with a very worn set of ‘Diamond’ gripped darts that became the Melbourne Special Edition.”

Our contributor thinks it’s possible that adding the gold coating has softened the grip, or at least its feel, much earlier in the darts life. Thus it has become the perfect hybrid for Peter’s priorities. The feel is similar to that worn diamond, the base model is one he has huge success with (Euro 11) and the look matches Peter’s need for a dash of flamboyance.

Psychological:

Darts World’s product tester and contributor Joe Reid feels that the psychological element plays a big role in Peter’s decisions. 

” Peter has said in the past that part of his frequent changing of equipment is to keep his focus. He said that using the same set he becomes lazy. I feel that the coating could be a psychological change. The dart will have a familiar feel but with a big enough change to ensure that he adjusts and re focuses in order to use them”

Strive for perfection, achieve excellence:

Accuracy ‘Supercoach’ Steve Feeney suggests that its a combination of that heightened sense of feel that Peter clearly possesses with a ceaseless quest to achieve even the tiniest improvement:

 “As well as the visual aspects that we’ve seen Peter work on, he has a heightened sense of feel. Players such as Peter can feel or sense every minute change or fraction of a gram difference. Feel is so important to Peter, the dart must feel perfect and if it does not he will continue to strive for perfection.”

“We know from all sports and other research that striving toward perfection can lead to excellence.”

Historical:

Our testers at AIM180 reminded us that this is not the first time player has recaptured their best by adding gold to their tools. Their analyst said:

” In the very late 1980s, John Lowe started to use a gold-coated dart. He said publically that he was delighted with it as it gave him all the advantages of tungsten – with the weight and density – but the feel was more reminiscent of the brass darts from his very early day. This hybrid suited Lowey perfectly and enjoyed great success with them. A surprise World title in 1993 and some remarkable efforts against Taylor et al. in the PDC years.” It’s noticeable that he never went back or altered anything else during the rest of his pro career.

Peter’s Preference:

Over the years it’s clear that Peter has had a preference for the design used in the Snakebite Euro 11 Element PC-20 Gold. Initially, it was a standard ring gripped dart, similar to MVG’s, later the element grip was added. There followed a string of models such as the Mamba and Viper designs that were variations on the theme.

Despite the runaway success of his World Championship winning design, it was clear that Peter could, not shake his instinct for the Euro 11 design. Indeed Wright had smashed the average record on the Pro Tour with a set only weeks before winning that World title with a different design. Finally, has he found the perfect version of his preferred weapons?

Perhaps we should leave the final word to Joe Reid:

“The gold perhaps reflect that he is a champion, and that, for Peter, it gives that extra confidence boost, evident from his Matchplay success”

—–ENDS—–

Article originally appeared at dartsworld.com
Images: Red Dragon Design​

A Golden Matchplay: Sunshine, A Stirring defence and Peter’s New darts

The ingredients that lead to a memorable sporting event are many fold. The three mentioned in the title played their part in a tearful Peter Wright claiming the 2021 Betfred World Matchplay, on Sunday night, ending Dimitri Van den Bergh’s hopes of back-to-back titles with a sensational 18-9 triumph in Blackpool.
 
World number two Wright had lost in the Winter Gardens final four years ago, but this time lifted the trophy named in honour of his conqueror in 2017 – Phil Taylor – to cap a memorable tournament.
 
Wright had won through to the final with a stunning defeat of Michael van Gerwen in the semi-finals, and treated a capacity Winter Gardens crowd to another superb performance in the final:

“That one was for Jo [Wright’s wife],”said an emotional Wright. “She’s been through a lot over the last year or so, but she insisted she would be here for the final.

“I’ve backed up what I said to everyone a month back. “A lot of players have commentated saying I should leave the talking to my darts and that’s what I’ve done.

“I used to watch the World Matchplay as a kid and now my name is on the trophy forever and that’s special.

“It was amazing to lift that trophy in front of this amazing crowd. “As soon as I walked on, the crowd were behind me and it was a real goosebumps moment, the hairs stood up on the back of my neck.”
 
Wright averaged 105.90 in the final and claimed a £150,000 prize, denying Van den Bergh – who spent three months living with his opponent during lockdown in 2020 – the chance to become only the fourth player to retain the title
 
Wright was clinical in punishing early Van den Bergh misses to open up leads of 3-0 and 4-1, before reeling off four straight legs – including breaks of throw in 11 and 12 darts – to move 8-2 up.
 
Van den Bergh stepped in following five uncharacteristic misses from his rival in leg 11, and produced a 12-darter to reduce the gap to 8-4.
 
Wright, though, restored his cushion with a 13-dart leg and produced a ten-darter to move 10-4 up and close in on glory.
 
Van den Bergh rallied, finishing 87, 96 and 84 in winning four of the next six to pull back to 12-8, only for an 11-darter from Wright to halt his momentum.
 
The Scot then took out 62 to lead 14-8 and punished misses from the reigning champion in the next two legs as he edged clear.


After Wright then took out 84 on the bull to create a 17-8 cushion, Van den Bergh landed the game’s only ton-plus checkout of 105, but it proved to be only a consolation as Wright sealed the deal with a 13-dart leg on double nine.
 
Van den Bergh picked up £70,000 as runner-up following a stout defense of his title, which included a victory over World Champion Gerwyn Price and a second-round record 14 180s in his defeat of Dave Chisnall.

The popular Belgian remained upbeat despite a frustrating final, with his run on his Winter Gardens debut seeing him become just the second player in the tournament’s history to reach the final in his first two World Matchplay appearances.

“Every game I’ve played, I’ve dug deep and played my best but tonight Peter was just outstanding,” said Van den Bergh.
“Of course it was a disappointment [to lose] but I can say that I gave everything and never gave up.

“I said to Peter that I’ll be back stronger. I’m number five in the world and I’m only 27, so I’ve got time on my side.”

2021 Betfred World Matchplay Final
Sunday July 25
Peter Wright 18-9 Dimitri Van den Bergh
—–ENDS—–

Lead Image: PDC (L Lustig)

Red Dragon Player Launch 2021

​Red Dragon has fired the final shot in the annual ‘Launch Season’ for the major darts brands. Using the World Championships, and their ability to launch later than mainly retail brands, as a launchpad. This will enable them to take full advantage of producing a fourth World Champion in the last two years!

The Welsh company has long been an innovator within the darts industry and they have again blindsided many rivals with the short timeline for the debut of Peter Wright’s latest model (The World Champion SE tapered) which was available for pre-order within 3 days of makings its Ally Pally debut. 

Today’s fuller launch includes player and RD branded dart models and well as a range of new accessories for those hoping to get back to normal darts in 2021. Darts World asked us to react to the live launch earlier this month:

“And the New, Champion of the Wooooorld….”

Gerwyn Price – Blue Ice

A variation on Gerwen’s signature darts which might temp those who like a classic shape but feel the need for more grip.

” There is something of a classic underpinning to these. But with a seriously muscular looking exterior!”

“If you fancied @Gezzyprice‘s dart but wanted more grip these could be the one…”

Meanwhile the former champion still packs a commercial punch

Three new versions of Peter’s World Championship winning dart hit the stand today, shop here:

The Torpedo, The Diamond, and The Tapered.

These were a real surprise, there has been no great advance in this shaped dart outside of Phil Taylor’s for a long time.

“Clever use of one of the classic barrel shapes given a new lease of life. Adding @snakebitewright flair & @reddragondarts grip tech gives the best of both worlds”.

​ You have to love this idea, two of Red Dragon’s best moments of recent years combined in one set of arrows. Diamond fusion grip is outstanding.

“ Combining the outstanding Diamon Fusion grip with the original design of the World Championship SE could prove a masterstroke.” 

Again the fusion of two such popular and successful Peter Wright elements is a seriously smart move.

” These set folk talking when Peter gave it a debut at Ally Pally, it looks a great combination of his popular PL15 and the title-winning SE”

“Many will have to try this version, just so tempting……”

Red Dragon’s other Big Guns:

Johnny’s Be Good!

With Clayton winning events in each of the last four years and now claiming a huge title with Gerwyn Price it will be interesting to see if he kicks on again.


” The Clayton dart is a really effective design, this edition really improves its styling….”

” Jonny’s dart could suit a wide variety of payer, perhaps they may be tempted now?”

Wes Harms 2021

“ This is a really distinguished take on a pedigree dart. A wide range of throwers can get benefit from them……”

“The even, consistent grip offers great continuity and ease of use”

Jamie Hughes SE

“Jamie’s dart is a variation on a legendary barrel but with finer cut grip below the ID blank. But, with the SE grip, there is even less fuss than usual!”

“Simplicity can be beautiful”

Scott Baker – The Mod (Diamond)

“ Scott’s 21st-century Priestley style dart has been a long time in the making. But, with the Element 6 style diamond grip we can’t wait to get our hand on a set for test purposes”.

There was plenty more action over at Red Dragon over the course of the day. More dart models, clothing and accessories have been released over the past few hours. You can browse and buy the 2021 range here.



We will be looking, with our friends at Darts World, at the non-player and premium lines separately. Keep an eye on our social media or over at dartsworld.com

Wright Out to defend title – PDC World championship preview

The 2020/21 William Hill World Darts Championship begins on Tuesday at Alexandra Palace, London as 96 of the world’s best players compete for the sport’s biggest prize across 16 days of darts.

Taking place from December 15-January 3 over 28 sessions, the World Championship will once again offer the winner a life-changing £500,000 prize along with the coveted Sid Waddell Trophy.

The pre-Christmas period will see the first and second rounds played across nine days from December 15-23, with reigning champion Peter Wright to compete on the opening night against either Steve West or Amit Gilitwala.

Despite being the current title holder, Wright believes he is the player with least pressure on his shoulders at this year’s tournament.

Wright famously exorcised his final demons by defeating Michael van Gerwen in style to become World Champion for the first time almost 12 months ago, however the Scot insists he isn’t feeling any weight of expectation to defend his crown.

“I’ve already accomplished my dream. It’s the other guys who have never won it so the pressure is on them,” Wright explained.

“I’ve done it, so it doesn’t matter what happens now. That moment will never be taken away from me.

“That said, I’ll be going out all guns blazing to try and take the Sid Waddell Trophy home with me again.

“It’s every darts player’s dream to be World Champion. I achieved it last year and it made me cry like a baby on stage, but that’s just what it means to fulfil your dream.

“The other players need to watch out, because give me a chance and I’ll take it. Honestly, I think I can defend this title.”

An exciting first session will also see Steve Beaton compete in his record 30th successive World Championship as he plays Brazil’s Diogo Portela, while Canada’s Jeff Smith takes on Irish prospect Keane Barry.

World number one Van Gerwen opens his challenge to win a fourth World Championship on Saturday December 19, on a day which will also feature Women’s Series Qualifier Deta Hedman’s tie with Andy Boulton and Scott Waites’ Alexandra Palace debut.

Despite suffering a difficult year at times, the Dutchman has enjoyed a return to form of late and is rated the 5/2 favourite for glory with title sponsor William Hill.

“Of course, this year has not been an easy one for me, as it hasn’t been for a lot of people,” admitted Van Gerwen, who will face either Ryan Murray or Lourence Ilagan.

“There have been some difficult moments both on and off the oche but it’s about how you come through those moments.

“In the last few weeks I have been feeling good again and I can definitely feel the old Michael coming out on the dartboard.

“I have to thank my family, friends and management for helping me through this year, I couldn’t have done it without their support.

“Now I’m feeling ready to go at the World Championship and the other players need to watch out.”

Third seed Gerwyn Price opens his challenge to improve on his semi-final run 12 months ago on Monday December 21 against either Luke Woodhouse or Jamie Lewis.

The Welshman has enjoyed his best year in the PDC, picking up three televised titles, including winning the World Cup for the first time.

“A few months ago I thought 2020 was going to be a write-off for me, but it hasn’t turned out that way,” said Price, a first round victim in July’s World Matchplay.

“It’s turned out to be one of my best years on tour in terms of my results.

“I have found it difficult at times without a crowd, but it’s the same for all of us and we’ve just had to get on with it.

“The few weeks rest I’ve had has come at a great time for me because I was just starting to have a little lull in my performances.

“But the break has allowed me to recharge the batteries and give me my competitive edge back heading into the big one which I would love to get my hands on.”

The second round will conclude across two sessions on Wednesday December 23, when top ten stars Michael Smith, Nathan Aspinall and Dave Chisnall are amongst the players in action.

Following a three-day Christmas break, the third and fourth rounds will be held from December 27-30, with the quarter-finals, semi-finals and final being held from January 1-3.

In a change from previous World Championship rules, to reduce the possibility of sessions over-running, there will be no tie-break in any match. Should any deciding set reach two-all, the fifth leg would be the final leg.

Tickets for the William Hill World Darts Championship are now on General Sale from SeeTickets, with up to 1,000 fans able to attend per session under specific regulations.

Global coverage will be headlined by coverage on the dedicated Sky Sports Darts channel, while the PDC’s international broadcast partners will include RTL7 in the Netherlands, DAZN in various territories, Fox Sports in Australia, Sky Sport in New Zealand, PDCTV for Rest of the World Subscribers and at matchroom.live.

Schedule of PlayTuesday December 15 (1800 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Steve West v Amit Gilitwala (R1)
  • Steve Beaton v Diogo Portela (R1)
  • Jeff Smith v Keane Barry (R1)
  • Peter Wright v West/Gilitwala (R2)

Wednesday December 16

Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Ryan Joyce v Karel Sedlacek (R1)
  • Ross Smith v David Evans (R1)
  • William O’Connor v Niels Zonneveld (R1)
  • Chris Dobey v J Smith/Barry (R2)

Evening Session (1800 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Max Hopp v Gordon Mathers (R1)
  • Callan Rydz v James Bailey (R1)
  • Adam Hunt v Lisa Ashton (R1)
  • Glen Durrant v Beaton/Portela (R2)

Thursday December 17

Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Madars Razma v Toru Suzuki (R1)
  • Mike De Decker v Edward Foulkes (R1)
  • Ryan Murray v Lourence Ilagan (R1)
  • Daryl Gurney v O’Connor/Zonneveld (R2)

Evening Session (1800 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Luke Woodhouse v Jamie Lewis (R1)
  • Ron Meulenkamp v Boris Krcmar (R1)
  • Ryan Searle v Danny Lauby (R1)
  • Jose de Sousa v R Smith/D Evans (R2)

Friday December 18

Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Mickey Mansell v Haupai Puha (R1)
  • Darius Labanauskas v Chengan Liu (R1)
  • Wayne Jones v Ciaran Teehan (R1)
  • Jamie Hughes v Hunt/Ashton (R2)

Evening Session (1800 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Dirk van Duijvenbode v Bradley Brooks (R1)
  • John Henderson v Marko Kantele (R1)
  • Luke Humphries v Paul Lim (R1)
  • James Wade v Rydz/Bailey (R2)

Saturday December 19

  • Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)
  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Steve Lennon v Daniel Larsson (R1)
  • Scott Waites v Matt Campbell (R1)
  • Kim Huybrechts v Di Zhuang (R1)
  • Mervyn King v Hopp/Mathers (R2)

Evening Session (1800 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Andy Hamilton v Nico Kurz (R1)
  • Andy Boulton v Deta Hedman (R1)
  • Damon Heta v Danny Baggish (R1)
  • Michael van Gerwen v Murray/Ilagan (R2)

Sunday December 20

Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)

  • 3x First Round, 1x Second Round
  • Derk Telnekes v Nick Kenny (R1)
  • Jason Lowe v Dmitriy Gorbunov (R1)
  • Maik Kuivenhoven v Matthew Edgar (R1)
  • Vincent van der Voort v Meulenkamp/Krcmar (R2)

Evening Session (1800 GMT)

  • 2x First Round, 2x Second Round
  • Martijn Kleermaker v Cameron Carolissen (First Round)
  • Keegan Brown v Ryan Meikle (First Round)
  • Jeffrey de Zwaan v Searle/Lauby (Second Round)
  • Jonny Clayton v Henderson/Kantele (Second Round)

Monday December 21 (1800 GMT)

  • 4x Second Round
  • Krzysztof Ratajski v Joyce/Sedlacek (R2)
  • Ian White v Huybrechts/Zhuang (R2)
  • Gerwyn Price v Woodhouse/J Lewis (R2)
  • Gabriel Clemens v Hamilton/Kurz (R2)

Tuesday December 22

Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)

  • 4x Second Round
  • Brendan Dolan v De Decker/Foulkes (R2)
  • Joe Cullen v Jones/Teehan (R2)
  • Simon Whitlock v Labanauskas/Liu (R2)

Adrian Lewis v Heta/Baggish (R2)

Evening Session (1800 GMT)

  • 4x Second Round
  • Danny Noppert v Kleermaker/Carolissen (R2)
  • Devon Petersen v Lennon/Larsson (R2)
  • Rob Cross v Van Duijvenbode/Brooks (R2)
  • Dimitri Van den Bergh v Humphries/Lim (R2)

Wednesday December 23

Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)

  • 4x Second Round
  • Ricky Evans v Mansell/Puha (Second Round)
  • Gary Anderson v Razma/Suzuki (Second Round)
  • Stephen Bunting v Boulton/Hedman (Second Round)
  • Mensur Suljovic v Kuivenhoven/Edgar (Second Round)

Evening Session (1800 GMT)

4x Second Round                        

  • Dave Chisnall v Brown/Meikle (R2)
  • Jermaine Wattimena v Telnekes/Kenny (R2)
  • Nathan Aspinall v Waites/Campbell (R2)
  • Michael Smith v Lowe/Gorbunov (R2)
  • Sunday December 27

Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)

  • 3x Third Round
  • Evening Session (1800 GMT)
  • 3x Third Round
  • Monday December 28
  • Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)
  • 3x Third Round
  • Evening Session (1800 GMT)
  • 3x Third Round
  • Tuesday December 29
  • Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)
  • 3x Third Round
  • Evening Session (1800 GMT)
  • 1x Third Round, 2x Fourth Round
  • Wednesday December 30
  • Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)
  • 3x Fourth Round
  • Evening Session (1800 GMT)
  • 3x Fourth Round
  • Friday January 1
  • Afternoon Session (1200 GMT)
  • 2x Quarter-Finals
  • Evening Session (1800 GMT)
  • 2x Quarter-Finals
  • Saturday January 2 (1800 GMT)
  • Semi-Finals
  • Sunday January 3 (1930 GMT)
  • Final

Draw Bracket – Second Round Onwards

  • (1) Michael van Gerwen v Ryan Murray/Lourence Ilagan
  • (32) Ricky Evans v Mickey Mansell/Haupai Puha
  • (16) Joe Cullen v Wayne Jones/Ciaran Teehan
  • (17) Jonny Clayton v John Henderson/Marko Kantele
  • (8) Dave Chisnall v Keegan Brown/Ryan Meikle
  • (25) Danny Noppert v Martijn Kleermaker/Cameron Carolissen
  • (9) Dimitri Van den Bergh v Luke Humphries/Paul Lim
  • (24) Jermaine Wattimena v Derk Telnekes/Nick Kenny
  • (4) Michael Smith v Jason Lowe/Dmitriy Gorbunov
  • (29) Devon Petersen v Steve Lennon/Daniel Larsson
  • (13) Gary Anderson v Madars Razma/Toru Suzuki
  • (20) Mensur Suljovic v Maik Kuivenhoven/Matthew Edgar
  • (5) Rob Cross v Dirk van Duijvenbode/Bradley Brooks
  • (28) Jamie Hughes v Adam Hunt/Lisa Ashton
  • (12) Glen Durrant v Steve Beaton/Diogo Portela
  • (21) Adrian Lewis v Damon Heta/Danny Baggish
  • (2) Peter Wright v Steve West/Amit Gilitwala
  • (31) Gabriel Clemens v Andy Hamilton/Nico Kurz
  • (15) Krzysztof Ratajski v Ryan Joyce/Karel Sedlacek
  • (18) Simon Whitlock v Darius Labanauskas/Chengan Liu
  • (7) James Wade v Callan Rydz/James Bailey
  • (26) Stephen Bunting v Andy Boulton/Deta Hedman
  • (10) Ian White v Kim Huybrechts/Di Zhuang
  • (23) Jeffrey de Zwaan v Ryan Searle/Danny Lauby
  • (3) Gerwyn Price v Luke Woodhouse/Jamie Lewis
  • (30) Brendan Dolan v Mike De Decker/Edward Foulkes
  • (14) Jose de Sousa v Ross Smith/David Evans
  • (19) Mervyn King v Max Hopp/Gordon Mathers
  • (6) Nathan Aspinall v Scott Waites/Matt Campbell
  • (27) Vincent van der Voort v Ron Meulenkamp/Boris Krcmar
  • (11) Daryl Gurney v William O’Connor/Niels Zonneveld
  • (22) Chris Dobey v Jeff Smith/Keane Barry
  • Format
  • First Round – Best of five sets
  • Second Round – Best of five sets
  • Third Round – Best of seven sets
  • Fourth Round – Best of seven sets
  • Quarter-Finals – Best of nine sets
  • Semi-Finals – Best of 11 sets
  • Final – Best of 13 sets
  • There will be no tie-break in any match. Should any deciding set reach two-all, the fifth leg would be the final leg.
  • Prize Fund
  • Winner – £500,000
  • Runner-Up – £200,000
  • Semi-Finalists – £100,000
  • Quarter-Finalists – £50,000
  • Fourth Round – £35,000
  • Third Round – £25,000
  • Second Round – £15,000
  • First Round – £7,500

William Hill Outright Winner Odds

  • 5/2 – Michael van Gerwen
  • 5/1 – Gerwyn Price
  • 6/1 – Peter Wright
  • 14/1 – Michael Smith
  • 16/1 – Jose se Sousa
  • 20/1 – Dimitri Van den Bergh, Nathan Aspinall
  • 28/1 – Glen Durrant, Devon Petersen
  • 33/1 – James Wade, Gary Anderson
  • 40/1 – Damon Heta
  • 50/1 – Krzysztof Ratajski, Dave Chisnall, Rob Cross, Simon Whitlock
  • 66/1 – Dirk van Duijvenbode
  • 80/1 – Jeffrey de Zwaan, Luke Humphries, Ian White, Daryl Gurney, Joe Cullen
  • 100/1 – Mensur Suljovic, Gabriel Clemens, Mervyn King, Jonny Clayton
  • 125/1 – Chris Dobey, Adrian Lewis
  • 150/1 – Ryan Searle
  • 200/1 – Danny Noppert, Jermaine Wattimena, Max Hopp
  • 250/1 – Keane Barry, Ross Smith, Vincent van der Voort, Callan Rydz, Ryan Joyce, Stephen Bunting
  • 300/1 – David Evans, Jeff Smith, Boris Krcmar, Darius Labanauskas, Scott Waites, William O’Connor, Kim Huybrechts, Steve Lennon, Jamie Hughes
  • 400/1 – Jason Lowe, Karel Sedlacek, Ron Meulenkamp, Brendan Dolan, Nico Kurz, Ricky Evans, John Henderson
  • 500/1 – Martijn Kleermaker, Nick Kenny, Jamie Lewis, Matt Campbell, Andy Boulton, Danny Baggish, Steve West, Keegan Brown, Lourence Ilagan, Luke Woodhouse, Niels Zonneveld, Mike De Decker, Steve Beaton
  • 750/1 – Madars Razma, Mickey Mansell, Ryan Murray, Derk Telnekes, Adam Hunt, Ryan Meikle, Andy Hamilton, Edward Shoji Foulkes, Maik Kuivenhoven, Wayne Jones, Bradley Brooks, Ciaran Teehan
  • 1000/1 – Diogo Portela, Daniel Larsson, Marko Kantele, Matthew Edgar, Haupai Puha, Toru Suzuki, Paul Lim, Lisa Ashton
  • 1500/1 – Gordon Mathers, Cameron Carolissen, Dmitriy Gorbunov, Danny Lauby, Chengan Liu, James Bailey
  • 2000/1 – Di Zhuang, Amit Gilitwala, Deta Hedman

Odds courtesy williamhill.com and correct at time of publication. Subject to fluctuation


Words: PDC

Featured Pic: L Lustig

SnapShot Review: Peter Wright World Championship Edition

  • Product: Darts (Steel Tip)  
  • Brand: Red Dragon 
  • Model Name: Peter Wright (World Champion Edition) 
  • Variation: 21g 
  • Material: 90% Tungsten 
  • price: RRP: £49.90+ 

General: 

This edition was commissioned to celebrate Snakebite’s victory in the World ChampionshipsIt has gone from strength to strength since and proven very popular. Despite conventional dimensions (54.6mm long x 5.9mm wide (widest)), the World Champion Edition is certainly not conventional in other ways! 

It is a superbly engineered but simple looking dart. The rainbow areas look sharp and practical with the lurid colour flashes adding a dash of flamboyance. The grip is impressive and well placed. Cuts to the barrel are used in a traditional pattern in order to produce a dart that looks and feels grippier than most similar barrels. 

These sections mean that the grip is very flexible, and suitable, it appears, so far, from testing, for almost any type of player. A very wide cross-section of players  liked this dart and enjoyed trialing it. 

The tradtional steel point is black and lends into the barrel visually. It’s a solid addition and rounds off the dart of well.

The retail set available here.

What’s in the Box? 

As with most Red Dragon darts, these days, the pack comes with one set of (Peter Wright WC) barrels (21g) together with a set of (black) Nitro-Tech stems and Snakebite coordinated (Purple, Black & White) set of Hardcore flights. The set up can be easily replicated via the Red Dragon store. 

Tester Quotes: 

“…I loved the grip on the lower half of the dart. It feels like I can put my fingers where I want and it feels the same…” County Lady Player 

” … there is a bit of my old Bob Anderson’s in them but much better…” Youth player 

” these are just so much better than I imagined. I was never keen on this style of dart but this is just totally different…” Elite player

Debbie Downers: 

They seem very few negatives here though. One player was not keen on the lurid nature of the coating that highlights the top end of the barrel. Another would have preferred the blank in the centre to either be moved or removed. In honesty these things are simply a matter of personal taste. 

Durability – So far, the Snakebite (WC) have stood up very well they have been used in close to three hundred legs by a variety of different players over quite a few weeks. 

Value – At under £50, for World Champion’s dart, these are excellent value for money. All testers agreed that they would happily purchase at this price. 

Marks – 9.0/10 – The SWC has received one of the highest marks of any dart we have tested so far. Indeed, a maximum 10/10s was awarded with nothing negative to say. One player has switched to them and we suspect another is hoping for his weight to be released! 

SnapShot: An Outstanding dart, popular with all testers and throw styles. Durable, exciting, and flexible, as well as superbly engineered and manufactured. A truly Worthy, World Champion Edition! 


Testing & words by AIM:

Review originally appeared in Darts World Magazine 570 & dartsworld.com

Check out Peter Wright’s full product range, from Red Dragon Darts, here.

Snakebite Euro 11 Element (Blue) from Red Dragon – In Depth Review

Snakebite Euro 11 (Element Blue) – The SnapShot Review.

By CJ Harris-Hulme -January 15, 2020

A.I.M: contributed to the “Choose Your Weapons” section of http://dartsworld.com. Darts World Magazine kindly provided the test set.

Snakebite set a World Record with his ‘Element Blue ‘ during 2019
PIC;LAWRENCE LUSTIG.
  • Product: Darts (Steel Tip) 
  • Brand: Red Dragon 
  • Model Name: Euro 11 – Element Blue (Peter Wright) 
  • Variation / Edition: 24g 

General Summary: 

Element Blue are a superbly built, and finely engineered, addition to the, Premium Player, section of the market. Originally commissioned to celebrate the World Cup Peter & Gary Anderson’s World Cup of Darts win. Also used by Peter Wright in setting his 2019 World Record Average from on-line specialist Red Dragon darts. 

The element (diamond) grip is complimented by colourful a ‘Snakebite’ theme

For such a seriously gripped and engineered dart it has a remarkably slim feel and look. Later the Red Dragon Element (Fusion Diamond) Grip was added to an edition and know it has been coloured blue! The grip is both impressive and unusual.  

Element Blue will suit most players, especially those with a lighter grip. Direct throwers will be captured! 

Cost: At just under £70, ‘Blue’ are a premium piece of design, production and performance that you would expect. (http://www.reddragondarts.com/peter-wright-snakebite-euro-11-blue-element-world-cup-se-24-gram)

As supplied, the 24g edition.

What’s In the Box:  

Snakebite Euro 11 Element (Blue)come in the recent type, Peter Wright styled, pull-out box. Inside are three barrels, three nitro stems (White) and a set of Peter Wright, std shape, flights. 

Tester Quotes:

“MVG might get even better with these, especially worn in ones” ….Our Serious Amateur

“I love the grip, it’s quite aggressive yet, it feels less likely to stick than deep/sharp grooves” ….. Our Pub Player

Testing Process: A.I.M: used three different players, one elite, one strong amateur and one ‘pub’ player, and subjected ‘Blue’ to a variety of throw styles, conditions and set ups. In total over one hundred legs with a four-figure total of darts thrown. Our testers used ‘Element Blue’ in competitive practice, training drills, over a weekend for social games, a practise session and a league knockout. 

In addition to the supplied set up, Snakebite Flights & Nitro Stems, players were asked to try their preferred combination or any other set up they felt might work. 

A 20g (Soft Tip) version is also available.

Variations:  Element Blue is available in soft tip at 20g as well as the 24g steel tip tested here. The traditional silver/grey model is also available in a 20g version. 

The Results:  All three of our testers were impressed with the general look of the Element model. The diamond grip intrigued them whilst the blue/purple colour was deemed attractive and “not too harsh on the eye”. Two of our three players liked the initial feel of the dart in their hand. The words ‘different’ and ‘corse’ were popular.  

Downsides:  Our players rated the looks, production and initial feel, of the dart, very highly. However, it became clear that the ‘Element Blue’ took a bit of getting used to and that some players would not adjust. The diamond fusion is more a surface than a grip and some felt unsure of its feel. A firmest holder also felt it was just too aggressive, the sheer complexity of the grip gives the impression of a fatter, not consistent, middle section of the dart although he did accept that a worn set might be perfect! 

The Tech Bit:  For a heavily engineered dart ‘Element Blue’come in at a slim 6.5mm wide. The distinctive cosmetics and grip pattern combine to create the impression of an even slimmer model. The 54.6mm length is at the longer end of the spectrum and is advantageous to the direct thrower. The slightly rounded ‘nose cone’ area is essential on a long dart with pronounced grip as it enables a confidence in “going at the target”. The diamond coated(blue coloured) ring grips provide high quality grip that will mould to the user over time. 

The supplied set-up: Snakebite Flight & Nitro Stem.

Set Ups: 

Blue are supplied with a ‘Player Set Up’ of Snakebite Blk Flights & Medium Nitro Stems. This set up works well for the majority of throwers and is very high quality for an included item. The length of the dart seems to lead to no nonsense set ups. Two of our testers preferred a shorter stem version of the set-up, claiming a significant improvement in fluency. 

Durability: Blue stood up very well over the 1000+ darts that we subjected them to. The diamond grip does cause an increase in marks to the smooth areas of the darts, diamond is seriously hard after all! The colour scheme, and styling, of the ‘Element Blue’ seemed to distract from this in a better way than the silver/grey versions. 

The Snap ShotAll our testers agreed that the ‘Element Blue’ is a superb looking dart, a considerable upgrade on the looks of std version. It was also agreed that those who throw very directly will buy in most. The grips are quite aggressive and take a little getting used to. The cost, whilst high, is definitely justified by the tech and design that has gone into the end result. A firm thrower, who has a lighter grip will benefit most ironically an MVG type might gain the most! It is possible that a worn set of ‘Blue’ may well be even better than a sparkly new threesome.  


A version of this review appeared in Darts World Magazine (Feb 2020) and online here: http://www.dartsworld.com/category/choose-your-weapons/

The Ice Man Returneth! Price Retains Grand Slam.

Gerwyn Price produced the performance of his life to retain the BoyleSports Grand Slam of Darts title in incredible fashion by defeating Peter Wright 16-6 in Sunday’s final.

The Iceman, Gerwyn Price, adds another major to his impressive roll of honour.
PIC LAWRENCE LUSTIG:

The Welshman followed up his brilliant maiden career victory over Michael van Gerwen in Sunday afternoon’s semi-finals with an unstoppable display to lift the Eric Bristow Trophy once again in Wolverhampton.

Price had never previously defeated Van Gerwen in 18 previous career meetings but emerged a 16-12 winner in their last-four clash to keep his title hopes alive at the Aldersley Leisure Village.

He then wrote his name into the record books with a relentless demolition of Wright to claim back-to-back Grand Slam wins, averaging 107.86 and hitting 11 180s during a remarkable display.

“I’m chuffed to bits,” said an emotional Price, who picks up £125,000 as champion plus a £3,500 group winner bonus following a flawless week.

“I knew in the middle of the game that I was playing really well. I was hitting trebles for fun and putting Peter under pressure and he wasn’t playing his best.

PIC LAWRENCE LUSTIG: SEMI-FINAL MICHAEL VAN GERWEN V GERWYN PRICE GERWYN PRICE IN ACTION

“I was that I was at the top of my game and I felt comfortable all the way through that game. I’m happy to play the way I did – Peter’s a world-class player and for me to win 16-6 is outstanding.”

Having defeated Gary Anderson in a controversial final 12 months ago, Price has turned jeers to cheers on his way to retaining the Eric Bristow Trophy with his superb form throughout the nine-day tournament.

“This week the crowd has been fantastic for me,” said Price. “To come through that game and have the cheers at the end of it is a much better feeling than last year.

“I’m not used to this but they truly have got behind me and I appreciate it.”

A 100 finish from Price broke throw in the opening leg and he doubled his lead in 13 darts before Wright took out 71 to get off the mark in leg three.

Checkouts of 111, 84 and 88 helped Price to move 7-3 up before Wright – the 2017 runner-up in Wolverhampton – hit back with successive legs to halve the deficit.

An 11-darter from Price stopped that run, while he also took out 130 on the bull and a 12-darter in a run of eight straight legs to open up a 15-5 advantage.

Three missed match darts allowed Wright to keep his faint hopes alive with a sixth leg, but the respite was brief as double five secured Price back-to-back titles.

Following the success, Price moves up to third on the PDC Order of Merit, and he added: “I’m playing well, I’m up to number three and I probably deserve to be three, maybe two.

“I’ve had a good year, 18 months, but it doesn’t happen all the time.

“I’ve been playing well and it breeds confidence, and I’ve been confident in every tournament for the last six months. I’m just thankful to win this again.

“I’m full of confidence and hopefully I can carry that on to next week, it’s the Players Championship and hopefully I can have a good run in that.”

Price’s semi-final win had seen him open up an early 4-1 lead over World Champion Van Gerwen, and though the Dutchman eventually levelled at nine-all, the Markham ace pulled clear to complete a memorable win.

Peter Wright Collects Runner Up Trophy. Pic L Lustig.

Wright had booked his place in the Wolverhampton final for a second time in three years with a 16-11 win over Lakeside Champion Glen Durrant, who lost out in his third PDC televised semi-final of 2019.

Scottish ace Wright had defeated Price to win his only televised ranking title at the 2017 UK Open but was this time left to admit: “I had no answer.

“Beating Michael and then the way he played there, I thought he was trying for the record [average in a final].

“I was chasing him all the way through, and when he missed I was lucky if I was on 100-and-something! He played fantastic all the way through.”

Wright had switched darts ahead of the event to a style similar to that used by Phil Taylor towards the end of the Stoke legend’s career and was happy with his performances in reaching the final.

“I switched to these darts and I said to myself that I think I can get to the final with them, and I got to the final,” he added. “It’s a stepping stone.”

Van Gerwen had been bidding to win his fourth Grand Slam of Darts title, but has now set his sights on next weekend’s Players Championship Finals after being knocked out by Price.

“Gerwyn deserved to win,” said Van Gerwen. “I made too many mistakes and gave him too many chances. He took advantage and credit to him for that.

“It hurts not to take the trophy home, but tomorrow I start to prepare for the next tournament, where I will put it right.”

BoyleSports Grand Slam of Darts

Sunday November 17

Afternoon Session                                                                                  

Semi-Finals

Peter Wright 16-11 Glen Durrant

Gerwyn Price 16-12 Michael van Gerwen

Evening Session

Final

Gerwyn Price 16-6 Peter Wright


Text – PDC Official.

Pic – L Lustig

The Iceman Joins The Weekenders Club! Price Claims Back to Back Pro Tours.

Winning a PDC Pro Tour event is seriously tough. Players who win back to back Pro Tours over the same weekend are, almost without exception, or soon will be dominant champions of the game. This weekend Gerwen Price added his name to a very elite club.

Latest member of ‘The Weekenders’ club. Price claimed two title from two events.
Pic: PDC

The “Weekenders Club” now has a dozen members and requires its members to win back to back events during the same Pro Tour weekend (or equivalent).

Adrian Lewis (1) founded the club in 2005. At 20 years of age, he won back to back Scottish Pro Tours over one weekend. Phil Taylor (2) unusually not the first, joined soon after claiming both titles in a Dutch doubleheader. Typically of “The Power”, he went on to repeat the feat at least once in each of the next eight years. In 2008 Taylor did the double 3 times and in 2009 he went better with four back to back weekends. Finally, in 2009, a third member joined! Robert Thornton (3) claimed a couple of Scottish Pro Tours over the same weekend. Just to prove it was not a fluke Thornton repeated the trick but it took him till 2014!

In 2010 Wez Newton (5) claimed a unique treble. In addition to back to back Pro Tours in Barnsley, Newton had also claimed his place in the Grand Slam of Darts by winning through the 250+ field on Friday night. This three-hander is unlikely to be repeated. Mervyn King (4) had joined the club earlier in the year by claiming two PLayer Champs. King often starts the Pro Tour well but this may have been his best effort. 2011 featured Gary Anderson (6) claiming his right to join the “Weekenders Club”. His dominant spell over Pro Tour events during this time meant the only surprise was it had taken so long.

cropped-philtaylor-bullet-dart-pic.jpg
“The Power” Completed “The Weekender” 8 years in a row including four times in 2009

Two new members joined in 2012 with Dave Chisnall (7) & Barney (8) getting in on the act. It is surprising that it had taken RVB more than five years to claim two in a row over a weekend. He had had seriously good spells before. Chizzy was simply expanding on a superb first year on the PDC Tour.

2013 featured an anomaly, Jamie Caven (9) claimed players champs 3 & 4. “Jabba” has a huge talent but had not previously threatened elite clubs such as this. He is the only member not to have featured in at least one major final and or be ranked in the top ten. It is, therefore, a remarkable effort. This year also marked MVG (10) crashing through the door. It seems no coincidence that this was also the first year since 2005 that Phil Taylor did not record the weekend double. In 2014 Robert Thornton showed his return was complete by repeating his 2009 effort.

MVG Gurn Away
The Green Machine. MVG alone
has completed a 3- event
Pro Tour “Weekender”.

Three events weekends were now part of the regular calendar and, after missing out the previous year, MVG quickly claimed UK Qualifiers 2 & 3 over a three-event weekend. Lewis also claimed two from three in a throwback to his 2005 efforts. Two from three is not the same however as two back to back and should not gain membership to the club! Typically, MVG soon claimed a record of his own. He cleared up on a three-event stint in 2016. Three Pro Tours in three back to back days (although they were midweek) puts MVG  in a class of his own. 

58ADF03B-3254-4D42-905B-EA162AAFFCEB
Snakebite claimed 2 out of 3 on a Pro Tour weekend but no back to back. “Weekender Club” Access denied! Pic: L Lustig / PDC

No new member joined in 2017, in fact, no one claimed back to back Pro Tours at all. Peter Wright claimed two from three, over one weekend, early in the season getting close. 2018 proved more welcoming MVG repeated the effort twice,  Gary Anderson reminded everyone he could still do it and the superb Krysztof Rajatski (11) claimed back to back titles without even possessing a Tour Card. The BDO World Master had slipped up at Q School and was reliant on other performances and missing tour card holders to even get in the draw. Thus, as a non-seed, he could claim an unprecedented triumph.

Gerwyn Price (12) now completes the twelve players who have pulled off this difficulty feat. With the ever increasing depth of ability, within the PDC, the club is likely to remain exclusive!

Who will join next and complete the Bakers Dozen?


PDC World Series Arrives in New Zealand

The PDC’s packed summer schedule returns to Australasia this weekend for its latest event. The first of three Oceanic events will be The Auckland Darts Masters. The field, as in all the World Series events, features 16 players made up of a combination of PDC stars and local qualifiers.

Taylor v Wright 2017

Taylor’s previous dominance will not be repeated even by MVG.

Phil “The Power” Taylor will be attempting to capitalise on his Matchplay triumph and celebrate his 57th birthday in style. Taylor’s recent efforts have boosted interest, in whether he can bow out with a 17th world title.

Defending champion Gary Anderson will try to add, the 2017 Auckland title, to the Dubai event he claimed in May. Micheal Van Gerwen is absent with the Netherlands being represented by Raymond Van Barneveld the 2015 runner-up. Micheal Smith and Daryl Gurney, fresh from his superb Matchplay semi-final, will play in their first and second World Series events respectively.

Kyle Anderson

Kyle Anderson, one of four players, so far in 2017, to claim their maiden PDC title.

Australasian interest is boosted by a returning Simon Whitlock and Kyle Anderson who claimed his first PDC Pro Tour final last weekend, hitting perfect leg along the way. Corey Cadby, the reigning world youth champion, also proved dangerous in 2016. Cody Harris, who   reached the later stages of the Winmau World Masters in 2015, Rob Szabo, Mark Cleaver, Warren Parry, Rob Modra and, TV debutant, Darren Herewini complete the list of local talent.

Whitlock & White

Simon Whitlock, will be looking to continue his recent resurgence in the Auckland Masters.

Peter Wright and James Wade will also represent the PDC and be will be searching for their first World Series title. The Auckland Darts Masters will be held , at the Kents Arena, from Friday through to Sunday and is in association with TAB and Burger King.

 

Blackpool Power Gets Final Charge!

Phil Taylor collects his 16th and final World Matchplay title in glorious style. “The Power’s” final season in professional darts is proving more than a fairytale.

Taylor’s previous dominance will not be repeated even by MVG.

Having followed his progress through to the final, of this years World Matchplay, it can safely be said that the vast majority of darts fans were hoping that Taylor would pull off the remarkable achievement of winning the two most difficult title in the game a record sixteen times a piece. Many of the notable facts surrounding his win have been discussed over the last two weeks. His age, 56, his no longer playing the main tour, the improvement in other players, his more relaxed/carefree attitude and the huge gap that he will leave when he holsters his darts for the final time after the 2017/8 World Professional Darts Championship this December. Yet even these valid points do not seem to do justice to this remarkable effort.

The toughest test in darts?

The format of the Matchplay demands excellence and consistency from game one through to the end. As this event pitches the top 16 players by ranking, against the top 16 on current form, there are no easy games and very few that could be described as easier. Taylor’s 1st round opponent, Gerwyn Price, has reached a major final in 2017, as well as the final of the world cup with his Welsh teammate (Mark Webster), and is ranked inside the top twenty both overall and on current form. The format of first to ten, and by two legs, ensures that the throw is not as important as in other events and that no game can be won by winning a handful of important legs. The event keeps getting tougher as you move through the rounds with little or no time off during the later stages. Contrast this with The World Championships were the initial stages can be against qualifiers or lowly ranked players and can be won in second or even third gear. The final weekend can involve playing over 80 legs against the very best players in the world. To be able to do that at the highest standard at the age of 56 is simply unprecedented.

Taylor’s Route Harder Than Ever?

“The Power” dominated Wright in a style he has made his own.

As mentioned above Taylor’s first round draw was tough. But due to his currently being ranked only 4th in the world his route to the title was as hard, if not harder than for many years. His second round opponent was five time world champion, and current world No.8, Raymond Van Barneveld. Although this rivalry has often seemed come down in Phil’s favour it should be remembered that a resurgent “Barney” had bested Phil in the 2017 World Championships. Next up, MVG! Playing Micheal regularly is a pretty tough business and has already put a severe dent in one or two players belief. However Phil has played a very clever game in how he has scaled back his playing over the last couple of years. Thus any damage done by MVG has been very limited. Taken since 2012, when MVG began to surge, “The Power” only trails 18-23 in terms of wins and losses and is ahead 33-25 overall. Many of the games were tight and Phil had chance to win others. Over their last 10 encounters Phil has won 6-4 including short, medium and long format matches. Thus his 16-7 win ensured that MVG does not have it all his own way in 2017. It was then Phil’s turn to do what many failed to do during his reign as undisputed No.1, namely to go on and win after slaying the dragon.

The semi final performance was a reminder of the way Taylor has defeated quicker streak players over the years. Consistency and not bowing to pressure were the hall-mark of this years triumph and were epitomised vs Lewis. To then play the world No.3 over the long format final should have proven a tougher task but Peter Wright was playing against history and a tiring schedule of his own. Taylor’s post match interview gave an insight into how he reframes the situation to his advantage. His opinion that Wright was showing signs of tiredness ensured that he felt the upper hand during the game. In summary playing worlds number 8, 1, 5 and 3 back to back, after a difficult first round, with all of them in good form and some having the recent upper hand on you is a tough ask. Yet again “The Power” refused to be daunted.

Going Out on a High.

Although the difficulty of comparing sports is obvious, and the task of comparing era’s is also somewhat precarious, the occasion of a champion enjoying his final competitive season is one that all sports share and many fans will have memories of. Yet is there another example of a player having a thirty year career, announcing his retirement prior to a final season, still being ranked in the top five and winning one their sports premier/major events in such style?

Most sports superstars retire due to a waning of their own powers in comparison with those coming to their peak. Many still continue to play, even if slightly less, and slip quietly down the rankings until they either join a senior tour or move to the press/commentary box. Often it is many years from their last great triumph. Think about Nick Faldo or Greg Norman in golf, Davis & Hendry in Snooker or McEnroe in Tennis. Each of these champions had excellent single days or one-off events during the Autumn of their careers but they had long since stopped being considered real threats and often were entered for events based on past glories. Taylor could enter any event he wished, on merit, and would still be selected for any and all invitation events regardless of criteria.

Relaxed and laid back? Maybe but still in possession of an amazing will to win.