Tag Archives: Nick Fullwell

Game Of The Day – Middle For Diddle?

Hopefully those of you who have been socially isolated are managing to keep up with routines and things to keep yourself busy. Here is another ‘daily drill’ to add to your list:

Middle for Diddle:

A drill that focuses on the bullseye, first dart, to ensure you need less recalculation needed during match play. Recommended to be played after your warm up and between other drills/games that are more scoring focused.

Game Overview:

There are a number of finishing points, in a leg, where the bullseye (inner or outer), is the best/only option with your first dart. If you become familiar, and automated, when you see these numbers, your success rate will go up and you will react smoothly to any variation (or cock-up!)

Take one turn (3 darts) at these five outshots using the bull:

61, 65, 82, 125 & 132

Award yourself points on the following basis:

  • 61,65 & 82
  • 2 Dart Checkout –10 Points
  • 3 Dart Checkout – 5 Points
  • Left a Double – 1 Point
  • for 125 & 132
  • Checkout – 10 Points
  • Double Left – 3 Points
  • Single – Double Finish left (not single bull!) – 1 Point

Example:

  • Turn 1 – Bull, s3, d4 – 5 Points
  • Turn 2 – 25, Tops! – 10 Points
  • Turn 3 – 25, s17, 0 – 1 Point
  • Turn 4 – 25, t20, Tops – 10 Points
  • Turn 5 – 25, 19, t20 – (28 Left) – 3 Points
  • Total Score = 29

N.B. A single point is scored when going for the 100+ finishes by leaving the double e.g. for 132 – Bull, 25, s17 would leave tops and score a consolation 1 point. The same applies if you miss the double after setting it up with darts 1 & 2.

Variations:

There are shots that can be swapped in and out depending on your personal preferences and in order to ensure that you cover the possibilities that can crop up in a game situation.

63 and 135 are the most likely where you may use the middle ring as an option in certain circumstances or even as your default.

Levels:

In this drill it’s more overall aims than levels. The first order of business is to get shots at doubles. So a good aim is to get shots at all three lower numbers. Then set up the bigger ones.

  • An amateur or pub player type should aim to get shots at the lower finishes, and hit one. Score guide – (circa) 10
  • league player should be looking to take one of the lower ones in two darts & scoring points on the bigger shots. Score guide – 15+
  • higher level player should be looking to take two of the lower ones in two/three darts and gaining points on the others. Score guide – 25+
  • Elite level players should be regularly hitting 33 or more. (Importantly this should be spread across all 5 finishes and be repeatable if the numbers are swapped)

Records:

Frankie Dean profile
Play M4D between more 20’s type drills. Pic: Lawrence Lustig / PDC

This is a tough drill at the higher end. It sucks the mind into being too deliberate so dont play it two many times. Use it as a break drill between others and do no more than two goes in a row.

The record for this drill was set a few years ago, a duel code World Championship player hit 61 in 2, 65 in 2 and 82 in three then left 40, after three, going for 125 and checked out 132 – totalling 38.

Middle for Diddle is a harder drill that requires a switch in focus and then another half way through. It puts the Bull at the heart of your efforts for a section of every practice.

Enjoy and lets us know if you can beat 38 or if it helps improve your ‘Bulling’!


Originally published (with variations) at dartsworld.com

Pics: PDC / L Lustig

A.I.M:

Unsung heroes – Nick FullWell

Nick Fullwell was already known to many people involved in darts. 2019 witnessed him become known to a lot more. Hopefully, he is not finished yet! 

Nick Fullwell (left) collects another Challenge Tour title. (Pic: PDC) 

Nick has been playing professional darts for almost fifteen years. The last twelve months have seen him step up a level, in terms of results. TV appearances, at the recent World Masters, was followed by immediate qualification for the 2020 World Championships. Nick  joined the band of dual-code World Championship contestants after playing in the PDC version in 2009. 

It is, perhaps, at the level just below such rarity that the former Pro Tour finalist and West Midlands County player has improved strongly. Once again, he claimed a Challenge Tour (PDC) title but was not quite consistent enough to challenge in the Order of Merit. Yet, having begun to enter more and more BDO events, he started to pick up other titles and register strong performances. 

He has claimed the Torremelinos Classic and a clutch of finals, including the difficult Lincolnshire Open, the last year. In, what was to prove, a telltale sign Nick reached the semi-finals of the English Nationals in June as his run of success kicked on. 

All this was after finding himself in a tough spot during 2015. In April of that year, Nick had had enough. A poor run of results had resulted in no earnings/ranking points, on the Challenge Tour, with things seeming to go from bad to worse. Not one to give in easily, as his kickboxing black belt should signal, Nick sought out some assistance ‘on the oche’. For the next twelve months or so, he dramatically increased his practice and worked with a coach/mentor to see if he could put things right. 

The UK Open saw Nick again reach a major event.

A change of darts was initiated and, together with a stronger mindset and hard work, it began to pay off. Just over a year on, from his worst performances, Fullwell claimed his first PDC title winning a Challenge tour in May 2016.  Meanwhile he was showing superb form in Open events and, together with his ‘partner in crime’ Ian ‘Whippet’ Jones, winning or reaching the later stages of almost every one he entered. 

Tragedy, however, was imminent. At the same time, as this superb turnaround was taking place, Nick’s wife, and childhood sweetheart, Sharon was diagnosed with Cancer. Showing remarkable courage, the couple managed Sharon’s illness as best as they could, while raising money for Cancer charities, while ensuring that their two children were spared as much trauma as possible. Ultimately, after a courageous and lengthy fight, Sharon passed away. 

Nick’s focus and energies were then devoted to ensuring that his children were comforted and helped through school, college and more of life’s journeys. When time allowed Nick picked his darts and played for the sheer enjoyment of playing. Local events, a few county matches and a memorial event in honour of his wife. But family came first and darts was put in its proper perspective. 

Slowly, over the next few years, Nick has built up the next stage of his life and put his efforts back into the game he loves. He plays his county darts for Lincolnshire and has been playing more BDO events combined with the Challenge Tour. The rewards started to come in 2019, Nick began winning big events, and major opens again. He qualified for the World Masters and was unlucky to draw Scott Waites early on. 

A few years back Nick was encouraged to be aggressive and almost angry when he played, it was thought that this might get the best out of him. Nick and others resisted this and instead tried to be as relaxed as possible and enjoy the game. In short, he refused to be who he was not and remained true to himself. 

His reward was a place a place in the recent BDO World Championship. Finally, Mr Fullwell began to show us what he can really do. A very good performance in Rd 1 saw the back of David Cameron and Nick was unlucky not to go further missing out, against the up and coming David Evans, after missing a bull shot for the match. 

So, when you see Nick Fullwell play at this year’s events, spare a thought and perhaps a cheer, for one of the nicest people in the game of darts. Few have worked as hard, suffered such misfortune or deserve success more than he.